Google+ Google+

Attorney marketing survey shows importance of Internet marketing for attorneys

I posted an article yesterday on my attorney marketing blog about a recent LexixNexis survey of 4,000 U.S. adults about the ways they find lawyers. One significant finding was that 57% of people who looked for a lawyer in the past year had used the Internet to help choose a lawyer. This was the same percentage of people who relied on advice from family and friends, which was the way most unrepresented people found lawyers before the Internet.

The new blog post lists even more findings, and contains a special, limited-time offer for free Internet marketing consultations for the first 10 law firms to request a consultation. The title of the post is Attorney marketing on the Internet reaches 57% of people searching for an attorney, study finds.

I think you’ll find some new and interesting insights in the post. Please check it out. And if you’re interested in the free, 15-minute, no pressure consultation, email me at [email protected]

 

Social media marketing for law firms | Complying with attorney ethics rules

Social media marketing for attorneys is written about more often than it’s actually done.  If done well, it can be extremely effective. But many attorneys don’t use social media for law firm marketing due to the concern that social networking can’t be done without violating attorney ethics rules. Social networking image

The notion that an attorney can’t ethically use social media marketing was thoroughly debunked yesterday by Robert Ambrogi, who is both a lawyer and media professional. Writing for Law.com’s Law Technology News, Ambrogi offers 10 Tips to Keep Social Networking in Line With ABA Ethics.

Ambrogi admits that there are ethical pitfalls, but says “staying out of trouble when using social media is not difficult, provided you are aware of the dangers, and use some common sense.” He goes on to provide his 10 tips for using social media in compliance with ethical rules.

I’m not going to cut-and-paste or summarize Ambrogi’s tips here. Any lawyer or legal marketer who is new to social media needs to go read the entire article.

Social Media for Mass Tort Marketing

Having used social media marketing for mass torts since the occurrence of the BP oil spill, I agree that social media can be used within the bounds of the Rules of Professional Conduct. But, as Ambrogi says, there are potential pitfalls. One of the biggest potential problems is that of solicitation. Simply talking with non-clients on social networking sites is not solicitation, unless an attorney actually solicits employment by the client, and a motive for doing that is the attorney’s personal financial gain. [Read more…]

The Plaintiffs’ Bar Goes Digital – Increasing Information to Consumers

Online legal marketing by consumer lawyers apparently shocks Big Business. Big Business has funded a study about legal marketing on the Internet that’s actually pretty interesting to read.

Would you believe that law firms which represent consumers will spend over $50 million on Google keyword advertising in 2012? That’s the estimate in a 38-page study, The Plaintiffs’ Bar Goes Digital. The study was just released by the Institute for Legal Reform, a front-group for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Multinational corporations have been waging war on consumers’ legal rights by spending millions lobbying in Washington, D.C. and every state capitol. They also have spent the past twenty years or more funding so-called “tort reform” publicity campaigns with millions spent to limit individuals’ legal rights.

Don’t consumer lawyers have the same right as Big Business to communicate directly to the public?

Both consumer lawyers and legal marketers will find lots of interesting nuggets in the study. The study, which is based on its own “estimates,’ say the biggest law firm spending money on Google keywords is Danziger & De Llan. The Institute suggests that the Danziger firm will spend over $16 million on Google keywords. This easily beats spender number 2, The Sokolove Firm, which will spend a little over $6 million according to Institute estimates. [Read more…]

Attorney Advertising

No representation is made that the quality of legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers. The hiring of a law firm is a serious decision that should not be based on advertising alone.